The Dragon Slayer Beads – Troop 1819

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Troops of Saint George – Troop 1819 Dragon Slayer Beads will be part of the standard issue every day carry (EDC) equipment given to each cadet. The Dragon Slayer Beads have been adapted from Ranger pace beads to incorporate practical field skills with each Cadets Spiritual journey.

Ranger pace beads is an ancient tool utilized by the Legionnaires of the Roman Army on the battlefield to determine distance traveled by foot. Ranger pace beads are still utilized today among elite special forces such as Army Rangers, Green Berets, Navy Seals, British Army’s SAS, and now the Troops of Saint George 1819.

img_9720The Dragon Slayer Beads incorporate the Holy Rosary with a simple to use land navigation tool for training our Cadets in orienteering.
What do the beads represent?

  • The first bead directly above the Rosary ring represents the Troops of Saint George Motto “Parati Semper” always be prepared.
  • The second set of ten beads represents a single Hail Mary per bead and 100 meters travelled by foot.
  • The third set of five beads, or the decade beads are moved following every ten Hail Mary’s. For each decade bead moved it represents 1000 meters travelled by foot.

How the Dragon Slayer Beads work:

  1. At the beginning of Land Navigation, each Cadet will have his stride (distance of each step) measured by an Officer. For example, the stride of my 7 year old son is 16″. The officer will calculate how many steps needed (250 steps at 16″ stride) to equal 100 meters.
  2. During the land navigation training, for every 100 meters the Cadets travels, he will recite one Hail Mary and move the equivalent bead to the knot. Once ten Hail Mary’s are said, the Cadet will have traveled 1000 meters.
  3. For every 1000 meters travelled, one of the five decade beads will be moved to assist in tracking total distance travelled.

Hopefully this simple tool will not only aid the Cadets in their Land Navigation training, but also in their Spiritual training as well. Cap. R.W. Trenum

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